Posted 1 week ago
Posted 1 week ago

fuckyeahqueerpomps:

Wilder from the Crash Pad Series

Posted 1 month ago
Posted 1 month ago

pinkandporcelain:

if we could all stop for a minute and see the depth in this, we’d all be one step closer to being a more understanding sort of people.

Posted 2 months ago
Posted 2 months ago

Welcome OUT Ellen Page!!!

Here’s the speech:   http://variety.com/2014/film/news/ellen-page-announces-she-is-gay-1201105145/

Posted 2 months ago
Focus on what makes you happy, and do what gives meaning to your life.
Posted 2 months ago

autostraddle:

Casey Stoney Comes Out, Becomes UK’s Most Famousest Gay Soccer Player

In what might be the gayest thing in British women’s soccer/football since Bend It Like Beckham,…

View Post

Posted 2 months ago

chicagopubliclibrary:

Brain Function ‘Boosted For Days’ After Reading A Novel

From The Independent:

Reading a gripping novel causes biological changes in the brain which last for days as the mind is transported into the body of the protagonist.

Being pulled into the world of a gripping novel can trigger actual, measurable changes in the brain that linger for at least five days after reading, scientists have said.

The new research, carried out at Emory University in the US, found that reading a good book may cause heightened connectivity in the brain and neurological changes that persist in a similar way to muscle memory.

The changes were registered in the left temporal cortex, an area of the brain associated with receptivity for language, as well as the the primary sensory motor region of the brain.

Neurons of this region have been associated with tricking the mind into thinking it is doing something it is not, a phenomenon known as grounded cognition - for example, just thinking about running, can activate the neurons associated with the physical act of running.

“The neural changes that we found associated with physical sensation and movement systems suggest that reading a novel can transport you into the body of the protagonist,” said neuroscientist Professor Gregory Berns, lead author of the study.

“We already knew that good stories can put you in someone else’s shoes in a figurative sense. Now we’re seeing that something may also be happening biologically.”

Click here to read the rest of the story.

Posted 2 months ago

Oh, I <3 the butch. :)

Posted 2 months ago
Posted 2 months ago
Posted 2 months ago
Posted 2 months ago
Posted 2 months ago